Think before you click

July 2014, Warren Matthews

Summary

Social media has a lot going for it and we at Xtend-Life are high users of it. However, we go to great pains to ensure that information that we post is accurate and verifiable and will in some way benefit the lives of our readers.

I am at our Thailand office at the moment and received an email from the Bangkok Post a short while ago. It raised some thoughts that everyone should be aware of and that is not to believe everything you see or have shared with you on social media.

It is interesting how so often a bit of inaccurate information can be shared extensively and then people end up believing it particularly if it comes from a trusted friend.

We already know that if it sounds too good to be true, it probably is. But when facing desperate health issues it is hard to resist promises of miracle cures. Sometimes these outrageous claims would actually be humorous if it was not for the fact that they can be dangerous for some desperate and less knowledgeable people.

Social media can spread misinformation rapidly…usually inadvertently by well-meaning people who feel their friends may benefit from it. When it is widely circulated people tend to accept it as the truth…even if it is far from the truth.

Social media has a lot going for it and we at Xtend-Life are high users of it. However, we go to great pains to ensure that information that we post is accurate and verifiable and will in some way benefit the lives of our readers.

I have reproduced the article written by the Bangkok Post below in the hope that it helps stimulated readers to carefully consider the information they receive on social media before they either act on it or pass it on to others.

For the full article click the link here Busting online health hoaxes.

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